ANNOUNCEMENT:

Due to construction, the Ralph Ellison Library and Southern Oaks Library are providing curbside services only until further notice. Watch our website for updates about their reopening.

Due to the number of buildings still without power, all Metro Library locations will be closed Thurs, 10/29.

NOTICE:

All Metro Library locations are in the "Grab & Go" stage. In this stage, customers can come into a library to use a computer, print/copy/fax/scan, and briefly browse the shelves. Masks are required for entry into library facilities. Customers without a mask will be served by curbside service. Click here for more information.

Litfest Online

Join us for our 3rd annual LitFest! Writers of all ages, skill levels, mediums, and genres are welcome. Enjoy the opportunity to learn from industry professionals on a variety of topics, all online, all at your own pace.

Resources

So you’re ready to write your bestseller, but you need a little guidance?  Good news! , With your Metropolitan Library System card you can:

  • Check out an iPad for in-library use at our Almonte, Capitol Hill, Ralph Ellison, or Southern Oaks Libraries
  • Check out a Chromebook or laptop for in-library use at our Almonte Library.
  • Check out a Kindle Fire and/or WiFi hotspot for use at home
  • Check out books, CDs, DVDs, MP3 players, and magazines
  • Download or stream eBooksaudiobooksmusic, and magazines such as Writer’s Digest, Paris Review, The Writer, and Poets & Writers, among others
  • Use online resources like America’s Historical Newspapers, Film Scripts Online, Literary Reference Center Plus, and the Oklahoma Folklore Collection, among others to help with research questions.
  • Submit research questions to our Special Collections
  • Download or stream Feature Films and Documentaries

These are general services and features available to anyone, but there are also some writer-specific resources available here including curated booklists regarding craft in a variety of genres, notices of upcoming writing-related events in the Metropolitan Library System,

We have a great collection of audio and eBooks in our Overdrive collection which can be streamed or downloaded through the Libby app, available for free in your favorite app store. We also have Hoopla, a streaming service that offers movies, books, graphic novels, and music. And one of our newest additions, Kanopy, hosts a collection of art films, cult cinema, and documentaries, including many Criterion Collection titles.

I hope this is of some use to you, and please feel free to contact us at askalibrarian@metrolibrary.org or call us at (405) 231-8650 if you have any questions.

 

Online Sessions



Jerry Bennett is a full-time artist creating comic books, children's books, and shirt designs for licensed brands (Lucasfilm, Marvel, DC, Saban). He storyboarded for Mattel and Dreamworks and created animated book trailers for Scholastic and Lerner Children's Books. He also art directed Even in Death, an award-winning animated short, with talented students on the autism spectrum. He served as the 2018-2019 Paseo Arts/Skirvin Hilton Artist in Residence, creating and involving the community in participating in the process of comic art. Jerry is currently drawing more comics and creating licensed hand drawn sketch cards for Star Wars, Walking Dead, Stranger Things, Outlander and MST3K that are randomly distributed in their trading card packs.

 

  • Do companies pay for product placement to go in graphic novels?
    That possibly happens, and most likely the companies who want product placement will themselves have something specially created to have their products placed in.

 

  • Is there a rule about when it is okay to use a name brand in your work versus changing it (i.e. McDonald's versus McRonald's)?
    I’ve seen too many graphic novels that simply place the name brand without any hassles from the companies that own the licensing. Usually the publishing companies would tell you if it can be included. 

 

  • Do people pitch you ideas for what they think you should do for your next comic?
    Oh sure, I get approached often by writers with some great stories, but nowadays I have stories of my own I’m really wanting to see come to life that I can’t really entertain those other ideas anymore. (Unless it’s something that I’m absolutely stoked about.) :)

 

  • What is the best thing someone should do if they are trying to break into the comic's businesses whether as a writer or illustrator?   
    Get your comic made! Just go out and make it happen. We are in a golden age of creator-owner comics, and a fantastic resource in the internet to get it seen by the world and build an audience for your work. If the audience is big enough, the big publishers take notice. If you aren’t an author/illustrator, then find someone you can collaborate with and make that comic! Learn all about making comics! Network with all the comic creators in the area. (There is a huge group of us!)

 

  • If I am going to try and get my graphic novel published, do I need to have the whole thing written and drawn before submitting it or would I just need to write it and the publisher would find an illustrator?  
    Depending on what kind of story you want to tell, there are different ways to get a graphic novel published. Most of the time, publishers will want to see the whole manuscript if they are interested in your pitch. Having sample pages would hurt either, but be flexible in letting them change illustrators if you bring one along to collaborate with. Publishers usually match up artists with the stories they acquire, unless you’re an author/illustrator.

 

  • When you write a book, do you get a say on who illustrates it or does the publisher just have a go to set of illustrators they use?
    Established authors will eventually get more input in choosing illustrators, but writers generally do not have a say, though they can suggest illustrators. The publishing companies don’t usually have in-house illustrators anymore. They usually get established talent or discover new talent from agents, and have even been known to reach out through social media, especially for those illustrators with a large following.

 

  • What advice can you give me on how to condense my dialogue and story down to fit in a graphic novel format? I am used to writing novels and find myself being too wordy? 
    Writing a novel is definitely a different type of writing compared to writing graphic novels, which is a very script-based format. You can find tons of graphic novel manuscripts available to read online to study and find a style, of which there are MANY, that suits you.

 

  • What resources could you recommend to improve my drawing skills? 
    I would find all the tutorials out there available to purchase or watch for free. Also find books on the things you want to draw or improve upon in your drawing. Find critique groups that will give you HONEST BUT KIND feedback of your work. There is, however, no substitute for improving your skills than PRACTICE, though. ALWAYS BE DRAWING. Set aside a time, no matter how large or small, to draw. So many people talk about how busy they are, and that’s true, we are all busy, but your desire to improve is only matched by the amount of time you are willing to give to improve. 

 





Tune in as we talk to paranormal expert, Jeff Provine. Through his experience researching and writing about haunted locations across Oklahoma and running public ghost tours, he is well versed in all things ghostly. Jeff will go in depth on what it takes to write these spooky tales.





Join Andrea Foster, self-publishing guru, to learn how you can fast track your dream of being published, by doing it yourself- All for free!



Mark Woommavovah is a Comanche author that grew up on the Southern Plains of Oklahoma. He joined the Army and spent his career running all over the world. He was inspired to tell his story after seeing the joy that books brought to children during a Storytime in Hawaii. Since then, he used his childhood running messages for his grandmother, his Comanche heritage, and love of running to create his first children's book, "The Little Indian Runner".